Saturday, August 20, 2011

Australian Student Uncovers the Universe’s Missing Mass

Not since the work of Fritz Zwicky has the astronomy world been so excited about the missing mass of the Universe. His evidence came from the orbital velocities of galaxies in clusters, rotational speeds, and gravitational lensing of background objects. Now there’s even more evidence that Zwicky was right as Australian student – Amelia Fraser-McKelvie – made another breakthrough in the world of astrophysics.

Working with a team at the Monash School of Physics, the 22-year-old undergraduate Aerospace Engineering/Science student conducted a targeted X-ray search for the hidden matter and within just three months made a very exciting discovery. Astrophysicists predicted the mass would be low in density, but high in temperature – approximately one million degrees Celsius. According to theory, the matter should have been observable at X-ray wavelengths and Amelia Fraser-McKelvie’s discovery has proved the prediction to be correct.

Dr Kevin Pimbblet from the School of Astrophysics explains: “It was thought from a theoretical viewpoint that there should be about double the amount of matter in the local Universe compared to what was observed. It was predicted that the majority of this missing mass should be located in large-scale cosmic structures called filaments – a bit like thick shoelaces.”

Read more here:

Bookmark and Share:
StumpleUpon Ma.gnolia DiggIt! Blinklist Yahoo Furl Technorati Simpy Spurl Reddit Google

Share your thoughts by leaving a comment below...


TPCS Sites: PHP and Javascripts | Web Widgets | Guestbook Gadgets | Beyond Astronomy | Florida Beaches and Surfing | Book Deals
TPCS Feeds/Blogs: TPCS | Astronomy | Seek

Copyright 2010 | Contact | Privacy Policy Advertise here: